Netflix’s Coming-of-Age Tale ‘Audible’ Follows Deaf High School Football Team

LinkedIn
Three high school students from the netflix film coming-of-age

By Leo Barraclough, Variety

Netflix’s coming-of-age documentary “Audible,” which world premiered this week at Hot Docs Film Festival, follows Maryland School for the Deaf high school athlete Amaree McKenstry and his close friends during their senior year.

Director Matt Ogens speaks to Variety about the film, whose exec producers include actor Peter Berg, the Emmy nominated creator of “Friday Night Lights,” and deaf actor and model Nyle DiMarco, winner of “America’s Next Top Model” and “Dancing With the Stars,” and a deaf community activist.

Ogens, whose credits include Emmy winner “From Harlem With Love” and Emmy nominated “Why We Fight,” grew up about 30 miles from Maryland School for the Deaf, and his best friend since the age of eight is deaf, so he knew of the deaf community through his friend and knew of the school.

In addition to documentaries, Ogens directs branded content and commercials, and about 10 years ago directed a campaign about high school football teams around the country, and the Maryland School for the Deaf was one of them. He stayed in touch with the school because he “felt like there was a bigger story to tell,” and shot the doc last year, which was “the perfect year, because of the characters we landed with and the dynamic in the film,” he says.

Ogens decided to focus on the school’s football team and McKenstry, one of its star players, in particular. “I was trying to capture the teenagers’ point of view, rather than doing something observational from my point of view. I wanted to create an immersive audio-visual experience of what it sounds and looks like to be a teenager, and all those high school touchstones – your senior year, the homecoming dance, and sports. And so that semester of high school and that football season gives it a nice narrative arc to ground yourself in, but also, at least in this case, and I think in many cases in sports documentaries, sports can be a great metaphor for life, and more so with these kids – resilience and proving yourself, and the ups and downs of life off the field mirrored the season in a way as well.”

As one would do for a narrative film, Ogens was looking to “cast” his lead “character,” and McKenstry stood out. “It’s tough because every kid at that school has a great story. It’s about Amaree and his relationships, but also, in some ways, I hope he’s an avatar for the other kids there and represents them in some way. He had some conflicts. I thought it was interesting that he was not born deaf. He had meningitis around two to three years old. At the same age, his father left the family.”

In the film, we see his father attempting to rebuild their relationship. Other elements in Amaree’s story include the death of a close friend, Teddy, and his relationships with cheerleaders Jalen Whitehurst and Lera Walkup.

“You’re seeing the team, but through the eyes of Amaree, and even the other characters like Coach Ryan or Lera, his on again, off again, girlfriend and cheerleader, or Jalen, his friend and cheerleader. This made it singularly focused, which is nice and tight,” Ogens says. “I also think this could be a springboard for something larger.”

Click here to read the full article on Variety.

Paralympian Sophia Herzog has a mental health coach and psychologist ‘to get me prepared and healthy’

LinkedIn
Sophia Herzog smiling at the camera

By Cindy Augustine, Yahoo! Life

The Unwind is Yahoo Life’s well-being series in which experts, influencers and celebrities share their approaches to wellness and mental health, from self-care rituals to setting healthy boundaries to the mantras that keep them afloat.

Sophia Herzog may be a Paralympian bound for Tokyo and determined to win a medal in swimming, but in many ways, she’s a lot like her 20-something peers: focused on her future. The Colorado native, who was born with a form of dwarfism, has been steadily training at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, prepping for the Tokyo games — but she knows she can’t swim forever.

When Herzog, 24, isn’t training or obsessing over her dog, Odie, she’s been thinking about what lies ahead after swimming — and choosing to make her education a priority. As a graduate from DeVry University, an official education provider of Team USA, Herzog was able to get her degree on her own terms (mostly virtual), and showed off her ability to juggle her athletic training and career training.

Herzog will be competing in freestyle, breaststroke and butterfly heats as the Paralympic Games get underway on Tuesday. Before taking off for Tokyo, the athlete caught up with Yahoo Life and shared how she stays focused and mentally prepared.

How do you approach taking care of your mental health?

We saw how much pressure athletes are under from the [Tokyo] Olympics, and I think it’s really important. I have a mental health coach and a psychologist that I work with almost weekly to get me prepared and healthy, just like my gym coach and swim coach. It’s nice to shed a light on the pressure — Olympic superhero athletes are just like every other human.

Aside from being in the pool, what else brings you joy?

We adopted a dog last June, and he’s been [helpful] in disconnecting from swimming. Getting outside and watching him be joyous over the littlest things has been a huge help for me. He’s now my child [laughs], Odie. I’m only 24 years old now and this is what I’ve done professionally for 12 years. I haven’t really experienced life outside of swimming and I’m looking forward to finding what brings me joy — besides my dog.

Click here to read the full article Yahoo! Life.

Midlothian boy born with rare condition gets a special escort on his first day of kindergarten

LinkedIn
Midlothian boy born with rare condition gets a special escort on his first day of kindergarten Batman and Captain Marvel greeted 5-year-old Michael Denison outside his house Monday morning. He got a look inside a police squad car and fire engine before taking off for his first day of school.

By Lori Brown and Shannon Murray, Fox LA

MIDLOTHIAN, Texas – Midlothian police officers and firefighters helped make the first day of kindergarten special for a little boy who is facing some challenges this school year.

Batman and Captain Marvel greeted 5-year-old Michael Denison outside his house Monday morning. He got a look inside a police squad car and fire engine before taking off for his first day of school.

Then at Mountain Peak Elementary, classmates and teachers gave him a warm welcome.

Last week, Michael’s mom, Brittany Denison, made a plea on social media for kids to be kind and asked parents to educate their children about people who are different.

Michael was born with a rare condition called Treacher Collins syndrome. All of the bones in the lower half of his face are smaller than they should be just like the boy Auggie in the movie “Wonder.”

“We’ve had multiple instances where people have used the words scary, monster or weird and that’s really uncomfortable,” she said. “When you’re in a room with Michael for two minutes you understand immediately that he is just the same as every other kid.”

Midlothian’s fire chief said as the story spread on social media, his firefighters knew they wanted to do something to help. So they reached out to the family and school to coordinate the special escort.

“My name is Dale, I am the fire chief,” Dale McCaskill told Michael. “We heard you might be a little nervous going to school your first day so we are going to give you a ride on the fire truck.”

Michael’s mom said when she made that plea on social media she had no idea it would lead to so much support in both the community and from people all across the world.

“To see him smile like that, that was once in a lifetime. That was amazing, unforgettable,” she said after dropping him off for his first day. “He’s an extraordinary kid so I wanted him to have an ordinary year. But I can’t imagine this will be an ordinary year for him anymore. The welcoming experience of the kids being outside, the waves and the smiles, that’s what you want for your kid to be welcomed with open arms.”

She hopes that it creates an even bigger conversation for all families and all students about accepting each other despite differences and standing up for one another.

Click here to read the full article on Fox La.

Photo of Braille-etched Railing at Italian Castle Describing Stunning View Goes Viral

LinkedIn
Braille-etched Railing at Italian Castle

By News 18

Often the internet tends to shine a light on something beautiful and fascinating and a recent photo of a railing on a window in a castle in Italy has gone viral. And it has happened for a good enough reason. Sitting atop a hill that overlooks the Italian city of Naples is the Castel Sant’Elmo (St Elmo Castle) which is a popular tourist haunt.

Hundreds walk up to the top of the castle to enjoy the view but there is yet another attraction on display in the castle. A 92-foot-long piece of stainless steel is attached to the wall fence of the castle of one of its large sized windows and it has a poetic description of the view in Braille. The unique railing was installed by artist Paolo Puddu in 2015 and titled ‘Follow the Shape’ and has been a permanent fixture at the castle since 2017, a report on Ozy.com said. The art had won the fifth edition of the ‘A Work For the Castle’ contest.

Visitors are encouraged to feel the installation wherein they run their hands on the rail and those who can read the Braille script can ‘follow the shape’ on the railing to read the verses from Italian author Giuseppe de Lorenzo’s ‘La terra e l’uomo’ or the ‘The Land and the Man’.

Click here to read the full article on News 18.

NYC Ballet hosts disability-friendly workshop for young people

LinkedIn
Contributed participants in Saturday's Workshop for young people with disabilities

By Allison Collins, The Daily Star

New York City Ballet dancers raised the barre for young people with disabilities during a Saturday, July 17 workshop hosted by the company, Saratoga Performing Arts Center at the National Museum of Dance and the Cerebral Palsy Association of New York.

Dr. Joseph Dutkowsky, Pediatric Orthopedist with Bassett Healthcare Network, has been involved with such New York City Ballet workshops since their inception roughly seven years ago, at which time he worked part time downstate. The workshops began, Dutkowsky noted, after a mother of child with cerebral palsy approached the company asking for disability-friendly instruction.

Today, Dutkowsky said, the annual NYCB workshop at SPAC is one of “10 or 12” held “all year long,” though Saturday’s marked the first in-person workshop since the COVID-19 pandemic. The event included roughly 20 young people from 4 through 22 and was led by NYCB corps dancers Meaghan Dutton-O’Hara and Davide Riccardo, who demonstrated warm-ups and choreography inspired by the company’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The one-hour workshop was free to participants and included tickets to day-of SPAC performances.

Dutkowsky credited the workshops’ impact with ensuring their continuation.

“I thought, ‘OK, this might go on for a year or two,’ but the ballet has absolutely gone head over heels for this and totally fallen in love,” he said. “The dancers fight over doing these classes. These are professional dancers used to always being judged — on the stage, in rehearsal or in the mirror — and it can be a very self-absorbing life. But these kids don’t judge them; these kids give them a respite where they don’t have to be perfect … and that’s why they crave doing these classes. The love and care they have for these kids is absolutely genuine, and that’s why it works.”

Such rewards, Dutkowsky said, are reciprocal.

“It’s a very inclusive place and a very welcoming place,” he said. “It’s strength and diversity, because you have these dancers with the greatest control of their bodies … and some kids who’ve never taken a single step without assistance, but where some people see divergence, I see glorious convergence. There’s something wonderful when they come together, and each will tell you the other gives more than they receive.

“Art, in this case dance, is uniquely human,” Dutkowsky continued. “It’s part of us, and people with disabilities have the same desires for love and intimacy and they get angry and sad; art helps to bring that out. With this, they’re not just passive observers, they’re active in the art and they’re feeling it in themselves as they try to do things and explore their own bodies.”

Otego resident Ruth Modinger and her 22-year-old daughter Marybeth, whom Modinger described as “multiply disabled,” attended Saturday’s workshop. The opportunity, Modinger said, proved “amazing.”

“We did it because it was an activity that Marybeth could participate in and be normal,” she said. “She could fit in with her peers. She loves to interact and she loves other people, but she isn’t always appropriate with other people. With the children there, everyone was special … and she just fit in, and it was beautiful. Everyone could fit in, doing what they were doing, and there was a mutual understanding that you didn’t know what was going to happen, but it was going to be something special.”

According to a release from the Cerebral Palsy Association of New York, to regulate attendance of this year’s event, parents and guardians were encouraged to participate alongside their children, instead of occupation and physical therapy “buddies.” This modification, Modinger said, only enhanced the experience.

“With Marybeth being nonverbal, she was not able to communicate, but I was able to help her do the movements,” she said. “She could reach toward a toy that she wanted and that was her way of doing the movements; other children got really, really into it and were dancing and doing what the dancers were doing.”

Encouraging such differing levels of participation, Modinger and Dutkowsky said, underscores the program’s mission.

“The two dancers were leading, and one would always model while standing, doing it able-bodied, and another would model from a seated position,” Modinger said. “So, you were always doing what was appropriate for you, and that made it so inclusive. It was just adorable, and the emotions were so real and the kids just truly participated to their ability.”

Click here to read the full article on The Daily Star.

Fashion show — called ‘I Love Me and My Disability’ — will celebrate everyone, organizer says

LinkedIn
Trinity Jagdeo, center, with some of the models scheduled to participate in the I Love Me & My Disability Fashion Event this weekend in Vineland.

By 

The I Love Me and My Disability Fashion Event promises to be just that, an organizer said this week.

The show features 16 contestants — ranging from toddlers to young adults, all with disabilities — strutting up and down a catwalk in an array of donated fashions.

The charity event will be held Saturday at the Landis Theater in Vineland and will also be streamed online. It will benefit From We Can’t to We Can, a nonprofit started by a Cumberland County 20-year-old who has also created a comic book series four years ago featuring superheroes with disabilities. The goal, she says, is to highlight challenges these children and young adults face and overcome.

“In a world where they’re forced to look at their disabilities and what they can’t do, this is their time to shine, to show who they are,” said Trinity Jadgeo, 20, of Vineland who started the charity and created the comic books. “We have 16 contestants, ranging in all types of disabilities. It’s just an expression of being proud of who they are.”

Jadgeo also had a personal reason for starting her nonprofit. Her best friend Alexus Dick, 20, has a debilitating illness with no cure.

“I couldn’t just sit there and do nothing about it, knowing what I’ve witnessed with my best friend,” she said. “It opened my eyes about having a disability in a world that doesn’t cater to disabilities.”

Jadgeo said all of the clothes the models will wear Saturday were donated by local merchants. Food and beverages were also donated. Even though she bills the event as a contest, she said everyone who participates will be a winner.

Click here to read the full article on NJ.Com.

After over a decade of marriage, husband with Alzheimer’s falls in love with his wife again

LinkedIn
He was diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2018 and retired; a year later, Lisa retired to become his full-time caregiver. Wife and husband photographed in purple while smiling at the camera

By Gabriela Miranda, USA TODAY

One evening while watching a wedding scene from the TV show “New Girl,” Peter Marshall pointed to the screen and told Lisa: “Let’s do it. Let’s get married.” A very hesitant Lisa said yes, and the couple started planning their wedding. Except only Lisa remembered Peter was already her husband.

At just 53 years old, Peter was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, a brain disorder that causes problems with memory and behavior. Now, he’s 56, and Lisa says it’s difficult to watch her husband gradually forget pieces of the life they’ve built after over a decade of marriage. “I wasn’t very excited at first to have another wedding. I just wanted to set my expectations low in case he wasn’t fully there the day of the wedding,” Lisa tells USA TODAY. “The disease is so unpredictable.”

The couple, who have been married for 12 years, met as neighbors in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. They were married to other partners at the time and even traveled on vacations with each other’s families. Years later, Peter’s family moved to Connecticut and they lost touch. But after a year without contact, the two reconnected while they both were going through divorces.

In what Lisa describes as a whirlwind romance, they maintained a long-distance relationship until their children graduated high school. They were married in 2009.

In 2017, Lisa’s Valentine’s Day present to Peter was a trip to his doctor. Lisa and close friends had begun noticing lapses in Peter’s memory, but Peter was in denial. When Peter had difficulty forming words and phrases, Lisa knew something was wrong.

He was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2018 and retired; a year later, Lisa retired to become his full-time caregiver.

“It felt like overnight he was diagnosed and our lives completely changed,” Lisa says. “Cognitively, he’s becoming a toddler, and the disease is progressively so fast.”

One night while returning home from a vacation, Peter started giving Lisa directions to the home they shared, as if she were a stranger. He walked her into the home, gave her a tour and didn’t acknowledge that was the home they shared. Then Peter started boasting about his wife, how beautiful she was and how much he loved her.

“That was the silver lining for me, that although he didn’t remember it was me, the memory of me as his wife was still there. The love he has for his wife is still there,” Lisa says.

Click here to read the full article on USA Today.

Reflecting on Accessibility, Ableism, and Chronic Illness During Pride Month

LinkedIn
Accessibility poster for phighting words

By Mike Naple, Pulmonary Hypertension News

Pride Month, observed each June, is a time to celebrate LGBTQ history, community, and life through events and parades. Curiously enough, I marched in my first Pride parade years before I had the courage to come out and live authentically. While I think about that experience in San Francisco often, for many reasons, I’ve only attended a few Pride events since I was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension.

Pride can be wonderful for many people in the LGBTQ community; however, that is not always the case for queer people who are disabled or chronically ill. Pride events, including parades, are not always accessible or inclusive, creating barriers to full participation for people who also wish to celebrate this month. Whether the activity is walking in a parade, observing as a spectator, or joining the fun at a party or other celebration, these all happen in venues that can be inaccessible.

Making Pride more inclusive of those of us with disabilities and chronic illnesses begins at the planning phase. Organizers should think about parade routes, parking, seating options, and amplified sound through the lens of how to make the event accessible to all.

For me and others living with PH, hot weather can trigger or worsen symptoms, and June is when the summer heat starts to turn up. It is harder for me to breathe if I’m outdoors when the thermometer reads 90 F. If I wanted to attend a Pride parade or event, I would consider what accommodations are being provided to help prevent heat exhaustion. Supplying things like shaded seating that’s easily accessible, fans, and bottled water would help me decide whether or not to participate.

Last year, we all had to make adjustments to allow for quarantining and social distancing protocols to limit exposure to COVID-19. Work, school, family reunions, holiday dinners, and many other events took place virtually instead of in person. This dynamic forced many businesses and event organizers — everyone from restaurant and bookstore owners, to local bands playing to their fans from their living rooms, to those organizing Pride activities — to get creative to engage their audiences.

One positive thing to emerge from the pandemic is the recognition that we can make events accessible by going virtual, and they will be just as engaging and successful. Virtual events also give people options for how they choose to participate. It doesn’t have to be just parades and crowded, in-person events.

Still, accessibility doesn’t always mean inclusivity. When Pride messages herald themes of diversity and acceptance of differences, I often question my place within the community because of my own issues with body image and experiences with internal and external ableism.

A portable oxygen concentrator is a mobility device I use as part of my treatment plan to improve my quality of life with PH. If I want to participate in a march, I bring it. I have worn my oxygen concentrator to climate and advocacy marches before. But I couldn’t picture myself wearing it to march in a Pride parade because of complicated feelings related to body positivity and not conforming to mainstream standards in the LGBTQ community.

Two years after my diagnosis, I attended a Pride event to listen to a presentation on healthcare data for older queer Americans. I spoke up during the Q&A session to inquire about care for older members of the LGBTQ community who are disabled or chronically ill. This spectrum of our community often gets lost, or considered as an afterthought, and the presentation was mostly silent on disability until I gave voice to that absence.

I think about life expectancy and pulmonary hypertension a lot. With a mix of hope and trepidation, I look ahead to growing old with my partner. I also worry about the kind of ableism and prejudice we could face should my PH become more severe down the road and we need to make some tough decisions about my healthcare.

Click here to read the full article on Pulmonary Hypertension News.

Man with Down Syndrome Who Got Job at UPS Lands Permanent Position, Inspires Scholarship

LinkedIn
UPS worker with down syndrome lands permanent position and inspires a scholarship. The employee jake is pictured in his uniform in front of a pile of carboard boxes

By Joelle Goldstein, People

Jake Pratt, the Alabama resident with Down syndrome who landed a gig at UPS last year, is continuing to make strides at the nationwide delivery service. After getting hired at the Birmingham, Alabama UPS facility in December 2020 as a seasonal package runner, a UPS spokesperson confirms to PEOPLE that Pratt, 22, has now been asked to join the team permanently as a part-time employee. In addition to his new role, Pratt, a 2020 graduate of Clemson University’s LIFE program, has inspired UPS to make a $25,000 donation to the nonprofit organization Down Syndrome of Alabama, the spokesperson says.

That donation will go towards establishing the Jake Pratt Fund for scholarships for individuals with Down syndrome who want to pursue further education.

“College was one of Jake’s biggest dreams and he worked so hard to make it come true,” Pratt’s sister, Amy Hyde, tells PEOPLE. “Post-secondary education was once not even a consideration for those with intellectual disabilities. But now, specialized college and vocational programs are sprouting up all over the country.”

“The expense of these programs can be a huge burden to families who often didn’t imagine educational opportunities beyond high school,” she continues. “Knowing that part of Jake’s legacy will include helping those individuals and families bring us more joy than I can explain.”

Jake Pratt, the Alabama resident with Down syndrome who landed a gig at UPS last year, is continuing to make strides at the nationwide delivery service.

After getting hired at the Birmingham, Alabama UPS facility in December 2020 as a seasonal package runner, a UPS spokesperson confirms to PEOPLE that Pratt, 22, has now been asked to join the team permanently as a part-time employee.

In addition to his new role, Pratt, a 2020 graduate of Clemson University’s LIFE program, has inspired UPS to make a $25,000 donation to the nonprofit organization Down Syndrome of Alabama, the spokesperson says.

That donation will go towards establishing the Jake Pratt Fund for scholarships for individuals with Down syndrome who want to pursue further education.

“College was one of Jake’s biggest dreams and he worked so hard to make it come true,” Pratt’s sister, Amy Hyde, tells PEOPLE. “Post-secondary education was once not even a consideration for those with intellectual disabilities. But now, specialized college and vocational programs are sprouting up all over the country.”

“The expense of these programs can be a huge burden to families who often didn’t imagine educational opportunities beyond high school,” she continues. “Knowing that part of Jake’s legacy will include helping those individuals and families bring us more joy than I can explain.”

“There simply aren’t words to adequately express the emotions that come with this achievement,” adds Hyde. “We are so proud of Jake and the way he serves as a role model to others.”

Back in December, Pratt became a viral sensation when Hyde posted a photo of him on Twitter standing next to a UPS truck in his work uniform.

In the tweet, she explained that her brother works every morning at a golf course from 6-10 a.m. before running packages for up to eight hours per day.

“Thank you @UPS for giving my brother a chance & promoting inclusion in the workforce. Jake has Down Syndrome but that doesn’t stop him!” she wrote beside the photo. “I’m so proud of him!”

At the time, Hyde told PEOPLE that she was so thrilled to see UPS giving her brother a chance because it was “his dream to be able to live independently.”

“He has achieved so much, but none of it would be possible without people embracing him and giving him a chance,” she said at the time. “Jake is so worthy and capable, so it’s just awesome for others to be able to see that.”

Pratt’s greatness has certainly been evident to UPS’s team. In the months since that day, Pratt has continued to impress his colleagues with his work ethic and “enigmatic personality,” the UPS spokesperson says.

UPS driver Richard Wilson, who Pratt worked alongside, said Pratt “changed his life” and added in a video shared by the company that “Jake can motivate me any day.”

Click here to read the full article on People.

‘No One’s Ever Talked to Me About This Before’

LinkedIn
Rach Idowu runs a newsletter called Adulting With A.D.H.D., in which she has described the difficulties she faced in receiving a diagnosis for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

By Nicole Clark, NY Times

“When I was a kid, I had the sense things were more difficult for me,” Tiffany Bui recalled. It was hard for her to focus in school, and she was often forgetful. Throughout her life, she said, members of her family criticized these traits as faults.

In the fall of 2020, when she was a senior at the University of Minnesota, Ms. Bui, 21, was struggling with anxiety and depression. She visited the school’s health clinic, where she was prescribed an antidepressant, but her attention troubles persisted. When she later returned to the clinic, the doctor asked if she had considered that she might have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or A.D.H.D.

“I started reading up, just doing some self-research about what A.D.H.D. looks like in women, and it was like, ‘Wow, no one’s ever talked to me about this before,’” Ms. Bui said. She wasn’t exclusively consulting medical websites; on social media, she saw posts from women talking about their experiences with A.D.H.D., which she said were “incredibly specific and so relatable.”

Ms. Bui was referred to a psychologist in Bloomington, Minn., where she sat for a neurological assessment sometimes used for diagnostic purposes, most often in children; it included word association tests, math problems and pattern-recognition exercises. Finally, following a lifetime of symptoms, Ms. Bui was diagnosed with inattentive A.D.H.D. (A.D.H.D. falls on a spectrum of three “types”: inattentive, hyperactive or combined type. Inattentive is used to describe symptoms like forgetfulness and other traits related to concentration.)

Ms. Bui’s story is not uncommon: Many women and people of color are only now learning, after years or even decades of difficulty, that they may meet the diagnostic criteria for A.D.H.D., thanks in part to a wave of creators on social media trying to spread awareness.

These creators are sharing webcomics (like Pina Varnel, 31, who is known as the A.D.H.D. Alien on Twitter), videos (Dani Donovan, 29, does so on TikTok, and Jessica McCabe, 38, on YouTube), newsletters (like 26-year-old Rach Idowu’s Adulting With A.D.H.D.), blogs (such as 36-year-old René Brooks’s Black Girl Lost Keys) and memes (“tell me you have A.D.H.D. without telling me you have A.D.H.D.”) that aim to help people identify symptoms and find community.

Dr. Lidia Zylowska, a psychiatrist and the author of “Mindfulness Prescription for Adult A.D.H.D.,” said that she had not observed an uptick in women of color being diagnosed with A.D.H.D. However, she noted, “there is an increasing trend in awareness in the A.D.H.D. field and the general public that people of color, and especially girls and women of color, maybe overlooked and not given the A.D.H.D. diagnosis and treatment.”

Though medical researchers found, in a recent review of more than 300 studies, that A.D.H.D. was overdiagnosed (and overmedicated) in children under the age of 18, those diagnoses skewed toward certain demographics. White children are more likely to receive diagnoses and treatment for A.D.H.D. then children of color, as diagnostic models have long been based on research focused on young white boys.

Symptoms of the disorder may present differently in girls, and the emotional toll can be intense; one longitudinal study focused on girls and young women found that subjects who had been diagnosed with A.D.H.D. as children showed marked impairment 10 years after their diagnoses, including a high risk of self-harm.

“Eventually you hit a wall academically or professionally, and then you need to address all of these layers of built-up failed coping strategies,” said Leah Islam, 28. Mx. Islam had struggled with depression since age 13 but did not receive an A.D.H.D. diagnosis until turning 21. Their parents hadn’t supported their search for mental health care; it wasn’t until recently that Mx. Islam began discussing medication with their mother.

For some people, A.D.H.D. content represents a step toward identifying or explaining the ways they have felt different. It has also helped them advocate for their own evaluations; because A.D.H.D. is thought to be diagnosed in childhood, getting evaluated as an adult can be challenging (especially for people of color, who face implicit bias when seeking health care). People with A.D.H.D. are also more likely to be unemployed and therefore uninsured.

When Ms. Idowu, who lives in England, sought a referral for an evaluation through the U.K.’s National Health Service, her family’s general practitioner said that she didn’t match the profile of a person with A.D.H.D.

Ms. Idowu had read on Reddit about the difficulties of getting an evaluation and had come prepared with anecdotes from her childhood, as well as more recent workplace examples. She was given a referral, and nine months later she was able to see a specialist. Her most popular newsletter send details this process; some subscribers have told her it helped them navigate their own diagnostic processes.

A.D.H.D. has been diagnosed in 9.4 percent of children in the United States, according to a 2016 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with rates rising in the past two decades. It is debated whether children grow out of it in adulthood, an attitude that is evolving as recent research shows diagnostic rates growing rapidly among white adults.

By adulthood, many without diagnosis or treatment have spent years feeling isolated or different. Dr. Courtney Pflieger, a private-practice psychologist who herself has A.D.H.D., said that people with the disorder often experience negative feedback as adults. “It really feeds: ‘What’s wrong with me, I must just be broken,’” she said.

Ms. Bui’s own symptoms went unnoticed for years because she was able to do fine in school. Like many others who aren’t diagnosed until adulthood, she was “masking” her symptoms — adapting to neurotypical behaviors and standards in order to fit in. (Masking forgetfulness, for example, might mean privately relying on a bulwark of organizational strategies — like setting phone alarms for every step of doing laundry.) She still doesn’t feel comfortable telling her family about her diagnosis.

Click here to read the full article in the NY Times.

TSA To Improve Screening For Travelers With Disabilities

LinkedIn
A TSA worker wears a mask while helping travelers get through a security checkpoint at Miami International Airport.

By Shaun Heasley, Disability Scoop

The Transportation Security Administration is set to start implementing new staff training and screening procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities as they make their way through airports across the country.

Beginning as soon as May, the TSA says that it will educate its officers to look for designations on driver’s licenses and other state identification cards denoting that a person has a disability that may pose a communication barrier.

Several states have updated their laws recently to allow people with disabilities to add what’s known as a “communication impediment designation” in order to alert law enforcement officers of potential issues. U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., and 11 other lawmakers reached out to the TSA late last year to ask the agency to train its officers on the new driver’s license notations.

“We are updating applicable trainings to ensure that all (Transportation Security Officers) are aware of communication impediment designations and expect to deliver the updated training to the TSOs as early as May 2021,” wrote the TSA’s Darby LaJoye in a response to Kildee.

LaJoye said the TSA is also “discussing the possibility” of integrating communication impediment designations into its credential authentication technology which allows agents to retrieve pertinent information about a traveler by scanning their identification card.

Click here to read the full article on Disability Scoop.

Air Force Civilian Service

Air Force Civilian Service

Lumen

Lumen

Verizon

Verizon

Leidos

Upcoming Events

  1. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021
  2. The Arc’s 2021 National Convention
    September 27, 2021 - September 29, 2021
  3. CSUN Conference
    March 13, 2022 - March 18, 2022

Upcoming Events

  1. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021
  2. The Arc’s 2021 National Convention
    September 27, 2021 - September 29, 2021
  3. CSUN Conference
    March 13, 2022 - March 18, 2022